Tag Archives: book

Nov 2018 What Are You Reading?

I really slowed down on my reading this month because I wanted to really focus on the story I’m working on for the Make Your Way anthology (with the hopes of getting it written and submitted as soon as I can because it’s been two months since I decided to work on it).  So here’s what I did read:

Nonfiction books:

  • None this month!

Fiction books:

  • Rhubarb by H. Allen Smith
  • I, Death by Mark Leslie

I wasn’t a huge fan of either book, but of the two I’d say my favourite was Rhubarb.  It was kind of ridiculous and silly but I still found it to be a lot more fun than I, Death.  I read Rhubarb right before I, Death and between the two of them I kind of lost interest in reading for a bit.  Oh well, hopefully the next book I read is more my thing!

So what have you read over the last month?  What was your favourite book?

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Oct 2018 What Are You Reading?

Oooh, it’s Gate Night; Happy Halloween everyone! Are you going out tomorrow at all?  Are you dressing up?  I’m going to be working, so I’m going to just be wearing a hat of some sort (probably my blue cat ears that I got from Yunalicia last year at ThunderCon)

After reading The Millionaire Teacher last month, I was feeling a bit burnt out of reading nonfiction (although there’s still lots I want to read).  I guess that sort of translated into being a bit burnt out of reading because I only read three books this month:

Nonfiction books:

  • Don’t Even Think About It: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Ignore Climate Change by George Marshall
  • Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death, and Hard Truths in a Northern City by Tanya Talaga

Fiction books:

  • Cocktail Time by P.G. Wodehouse

My favourite book this month was definitely Cocktail Time.  My mom recommended I read some Wodehouse because they’re fun and light-hearted reads, which was exactly what I needed after reading Don’t Even Think About It and Seven Fallen Feathers.  My brother brought me both Cocktail Time and Carry On, Jeeves; I opted for Cocktail Time because it’s the one my mom liked more.

So what have you read over the last month?  What was your favourite book?

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Sept 2018 What Are You Reading?

This month I continued my trend of reading mostly nonfiction books.  I did manage to squeeze in a few fiction reads as well (but they were shorter novellas rather than full novels; even though there were three books, the page count was way less than the nonfiction).

Nonfiction books:

  • Bolt and Keel by Kayleen VanderRee & Danielle Gumbley (this is more of a book that you flip through rather than read)
  • Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time by Jeff Speck
  • The Wealthy Barber: The Common Sense Guide to Successful Financial Planning by David Chilton
  • The Millionaire Teacher: The Nine Rules of Wealth You Should Have Learned in School by Andrew Hallam

Fiction books:

  • Binti by Nnedi Okorafor
  • Binti: Home by Nnedi Okorafor
  • Binti: The Night Masquerade by Nnedi Okorafor

My favourite book was definitely The Millionaire Teacher; even though I’ve read a fair number of books on finance over the last few months, I found Hallam’s advice superb (and the book really is rather like an updated version of Chilton’s The Wealthy Barber).  I also really liked Walkable City (which I review on Sustainably North if you’re interested); ever since finishing it I’ve been looking at the streets of Thunder Bay with totally new eyes.

So what have you read over the last month?  What was your favourite book?

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Lucifer

Today, my brother Alex‘s Indiegogo campaign for his novel, Lucifer, went live!  I think the video for the campaign is excellent and wanted to share it here.

If you enjoyed it, please spread the word!  The book itself is an excellent read (I read several drafts and absolutely loved it!)   If you’d also like to support the project, you can do so here.

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90 Days to Your Novel Not Really For Me….

When I wrote my new goals for the year, one of them was to either edit my NaNoWriMo novel from 2012 OR to write a new novel using  90 Days to Your Novel by Sarah Domet.  In an effort to decide which I would prefer, I started reading  90 Days to Your Novel last night.  I’ve had the book for almost three years now, so I thought it was definitely time to give it a read.

The premise behind the book is that you are given a new assignment every day for the course of 90 days.  You start out planning your novel, eventually jumping into writing it linearly.  I believe at the end of the 90 days, you should have a relatively polished draft (I’m not entirely sure if this is supposed to be the first draft or not though).  Domet is a huge advocate of outlines and planning, so the initial planning stages are sure to help get you to a much more polished draft than you’d have at the end of writing a NaNoWriMo novel the way I did.  So all in all, the book appeals to me on principle.

But once I finished reading Part 1, I immediately started to dislike Domet’s writing style.  For one thing, her initial assignments didn’t really work for me.  She wants you to sit and brainstorm ideas from your life, looking for something that could be useful as a story idea.  That may work for other people, but for me, a lot of my ideas seem to pop into my head; I let my unconscious mind do a lot of the initial leg-work for ideas.

I also really didn’t like the way she harps on and on about outlining.  I forgave that in the initial section, where she’s trying to convince people outlines are a good thing (and I do agree with her – writing without one makes a scary editing nightmare, as my NaNoWriMo forays have proven to me).  But it hit a point in the book where she needed to stop trying to convince me that they’re good.

I realize that I’m probably not her target audience at all with this book, and that’s probably why I ran into problems with it.  I didn’t mind reading Part 1, especially when she talked about the different types of outlines.  But I don’t think I’m going to be using her book to help me reach my goal.  Instead I’m going to just trust myself: I know what I’m doing, and I can rewrite this thing my way.

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